Moderna has completed its submission to the US Food and Drug Administration seeking full approval for its COVID-19 vaccine for those over age 18, the company announced Wednesday.

The drug maker is requesting a priority review for its vaccine as part of the submission.

“We are pleased that our COVID-19 vaccine is showing durable efficacy of 93% through six months after dose 2,” Moderna’s CEO Stéphane Bancel said in a statement announcing the submission.

Moderna has been submitting sections of its application, known as the Biologics License Application, on a rolling basis since May last year.

The completed submission includes results from Moderna’s phase 3 trials that involved more than 30,000 Americans, the company said.

More than 1.4 million doses of Moderna’s vaccine have already been administered across the US.

Moderna is requesting a priority review for its vaccine as part of the submission to the FDA.

The Moderna vaccine has been available in the US since December after being granted emergency use authorization by the FDA.

The company has since applied for emergency authorization to provide COVID vaccines to those ages 12 to 17. That authorization is still pending.

Moderna’s announcement comes just two days after the FDA granted Pfizer full approval for its COVID vaccine.

More than 1.4 million doses of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the US.

“The public can be very confident that this vaccine meets the high standards for safety, effectiveness and manufacturing quality the FDA requires of an approved product,” acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock said Monday in announcing full approval, which comes as the US battles the highly contagious Delta variant.

The FDA gave emergency use authorization to Pfizer just one week before issuing the same to Moderna.

It is not clear how long the FDA will take to grant Moderna full approval.

The FDA has granted Pfizer full approval for its COVID-19 vaccine.

Paul "Pen" Farthing, a former British Royal Marine, may have the chance to save his animals.

A former British Royal Marine and founder of a sanctuary for stray animals in Afghanistan has gotten some good news in his efforts to evacuate hundreds of pets from the Taliban-controlled country — after the UK defense secretary said officials would help.

Paul “Pen” Farthing, 57, who had already been given authorization to get his people out, had been fearing that he will have to euthanize the 140 dogs and 60 cats if he can’t get them out by Aug. 31 — the deadline for foreign forces to leave the war-torn country.

But his so-called “Operation Ark” got a boost Wednesday from British Defense Secretary Benn Wallace.

“Now that Pen Farthing’s staff have been cleared to come forward under LOTR I have authorized MoD [Ministry of Defence] to facilitate their processing alongside all other eligible personnel at HKIA,” Wallace wrote, using the abbreviation for Leave Outside the Immigration Rules.

Farthing announced Monday that the UK granted visas for the 68 members of his staff and their dependents.

“At that stage, if he arrives with his animals we will seek a slot for his plane,” he added.

On Tuesday, Farthing said supporters of his organization, Nowzad, have raised enough money to pay for a chartered Airbus A330 out of Kabul — but British officials said there are “thousands and thousands” of people who need to be prioritized first.

Farthing had been fearing he would have to euthanize the 140 dogs and 60 cats if he can’t get them out by Aug. 31.
The stray animals are in safe hands with Farthing’s organization, Nowzad.

Wallace also noted in another tweet Wednesday: “If he does not have his animals with him he and his staff can board an RAF flight. I have been consistent all along, ensuring those most at risk are processed first and that the limiting factor has been flow THROUGH to airside NOT airplane capacity.

“No one has the right in this humanitarian crisis to jump the queue,” he added.

Farthing announced Monday that the UK granted visas for the 68 members of his staff and their dependents.

“We want to bring in an aircraft with 250 seats and we need only 69 of them,” Farthing told the Sun. “We are paying for it. It costs the taxpayer nothing and could be a bit of good news.”

Farthing has previously said the animals would be transported in the plane’s cargo hold and that once his staff were accommodated, any spare seats could be filled by other people cleared by UK authorities, Sky News reported.

“The cargo hold is empty — we put the dogs and cats in there!! And 250 people above in the cabin!” he said in a tweet.

Wallace earlier said the chartered jet was not a “magic wand” — insisting that the major problem with the evacuations has been getting people safely into the Kabul airport.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin on Wednesday ordered all military members to begin receiving the coronavirus vaccine following the Food and Drug Administration giving full approval to Pfizer’s shot.

Austin told commanders to “impose ambitious timelines for implementation” as the COVID vaccine is added to the list of inoculations that US troops receive as part of their service.

“To defend this Nation, we need a healthy and ready force,” Austin ​wrote in the memo announcing the directive. “After careful consultation with medical experts and military leadership, and with the support of the President, I have determined that mandatory vaccination against coronavirus disease​ ​…​ ​is necessary to protect the Force and defend the American people.”

More than 800,000 military members have yet to be vaccinated for COVID, according to the Pentagon​.

The troops will be able to get their shots at bases around the world, and the Pentagon said it has enough vaccine to meet demand.

The troops will be able to get their shots at bases around the world, and the Pentagon said it has enough vaccine to meet demand.

The memo noted that service members can also get any of the other coronavirus vaccines – Moderna and Johnson & Johnson – on their own.

Austin said that troops who have had a case of coronavirus are not considered fully vaccinated.

“Service members are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after completing the second dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine or two weeks after receiving a single dose of a one-dose vaccine,” Austin wrote.

The Pentagon says there are more than 1.3 million troops on active duty and close to 800,000 in the Guard and Reserve.

According to the Pentagon, there are more than 1.3 million troops on active duty and close to 800,000 in the Guard and Reserve.

And, as of Aug. 18, more than 1 million active duty, Guard and Reserve service members were fully vaccinated and nearly 245,000 more had received at least one shot.

P​entagon spokesman John Kirby said on Monday that the military would soon be issuing guidance on the mandatory vaccines after the FDA approved the Pfizer vaccine.

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin told commanders to “impose ambitious timelines for implementation.”

​“The health of a force is as always — military or civilian employees, families and communities — a top priority. So it’s important to remind everyone that these efforts ensure the safety of our service members and promote the readiness of our force, not to mention the health and safety of the communities around the country in which we live,” Kirby said at Monday’s Afghanistan briefing.

With Post wires