The Rangers started the year with heightened expectations and will end it searching for a new manager.

The team fired Chris Woodward on Monday, The Post’s Jon Heyman confirmed. The Rangers currently sit with a 51-63 record, 23 games behind the first-place Astros in the AL West.

Third base coach Tony Beasley was named the interim manager of the Rangers, starting with Monday night’s game against the Oakland A’s.

Chris Woodward was fired by the Rangers this season as they’ve underperformed following an expensive offseason.
Chris Woodward on July 22, 2022.

The Rangers were expected to compete for a playoff spot this season after the splashy additions of Corey Seager and Marcus Semien. The contracts totaled $500 million with Seager getting a massive $325 million after he starred for the Dodgers for years.

“We did not come into this season thinking we had put together a championship roster. We thought we’d taken a major step forward in talent from where we were a year ago,” said Jon Daniels, the team’s president of baseball operations. “We’ve certainly had aspirations maybe to overachieve some and still do have those, but we were, and continue to be, realistic about about where we are. … That said, we did think that we’d be better than our record, and better than the way that we’ve played at times.”

ESPN noted that the Rangers’ 6-24 record in one-run games has spoiled any progress the team has made with a near-even run differential.

Woodward, 46, will finish his Rangers career with a 203-278 record in three-plus seasons. He received an extension this offseason that covered next season and came up with an option for 2024.

Woodward’s firing marks the fourth time this season a team has its manager.

Philadelphia’s Joe Girardi was replaced by Rob Thomson on June 3, the Los Angeles Angels’ Joe Maddon by Phil Nevin four days later and Toronto’s Charlie Montoyo by John Schneider on July 13.

The Rangers now turn to Beasley, in his eighth season with the Rangers, and the longest-tenured member of their big-league coaching staff. He previously was on the major league staffs with Washington (2006) and Pittsburgh (2008-10), and had a 590-472 record in eight seasons as a minor league manager in those organizations.

“He has all the attributes that we’re looking for. He has the respect of the staff, the respect of the players,” Daniels said. “He’s an intelligent baseball veteran, who’s won at the minor league level, performed in a variety of roles, both here and elsewhere. … He’s the right person for us as we move forward.”

Philadelphia’s Joe Girardi was replaced by Rob Thomson on June 3, the Los Angeles Angels’ Joe Maddon by Phil Nevin four days later and Toronto’s Charlie Montoyo by John Schneider on July 13.

— With AP