Some “Avatar” critics are accusing film director James Cameron of cultural appropriation.

The “Avatar 2: The Way of Water” director, 68, is accused of stealing themes, history and imagery from Native American and Indigenous cultures for his latest blockbuster, reported Newsweek.

The sequel to the 2009 hit “Avatar” is about colonizers who attempt to take the land of native people. In Cameron’s version, humans have been forced off Earth due to its dwindling resources.

Much like the first flick, the movie boasts a predominately all-white cast playing the fictional Na’vi aliens minus Zoe Saldaña, a Black Latina actress, and Cliff Curtis, who is of Maori descent.

Native American influencer Yuè Begay is speaking out against the film.

“Do NOT watch Avatar: The Way of Water,” tweeted Begay, who is also the co-chair of Indigenous Pride L.A. “Join Natives & other Indigenous groups around the world in boycotting this horrible & racist film.”

Bengay also said that Indigenous “cultures were appropriated in a harmful manner” to satisfy a white man’s “savior complex.”

The sequel to “Avatar” follows colonizers who attempt to take the land of other people. In Cameron’s story, humans have been forced off Earth due to its dwindling resources.
Bengay also said that Indigenous “cultures were appropriated in a harmful manner” to satisfy a white man’s “savior complex.”

The social justice influencer referenced a 2010 interview the “Titanic” director gave to the Guardian in which he revealed that he went to Brazil and visited the Xingu people of the Amazon, a trip that made him reflect on the experience of North American Indians and ultimately inspired him to make the first “Avatar” film.

After the release of the 2009 film, the term “blueface” became shorthand in alleging the “Avatar” universe’s “appropriation,” per Newsweek, with the implication that the franchise’s representation of the Na’vi-as-Native Americans carried the same racist undertones associated with “blackface” or “yellow face.”

“‘Avatar’ is a science fiction retelling of the history of North and South America in the early colonial period,” said Cameron in a statement.

After the release of the 2009 film, the term “blueface” became shorthand in alleging the “Avatar” universe’s “appropriation,” per Newsweek.
“‘Avatar’ is a science fiction retelling of the history of North and South America in the early colonial period,” said Cameron in a statement.
©Walt Disney Co./Courtesy Eve

“‘Avatar’ very pointedly made reference to the colonial period in the Americas, with all its conflict and bloodshed between the military aggressors from Europe and the indigenous peoples.

“Europe equals Earth. The native Americans are the Na’vi. It’s not meant to be subtle.”

Social media users slammed Cameron’s inspiration for the film.

“Why watch a ridiculous movie about blue aliens when you could just support actual Indigenous people and our struggle for clean water here on Earth,” slammed another person on Twitter. “Yes, we do exist.”

The Post reached out to Cameron for comment.

Despite the calls for a boycott, there are those who support the film.

“I’m a “native” (just an indigenous person) and Avatar is good,” one person said. “The movies are versatile enough for the general public to swallow the big pill of talk around colonization.”